Chapter 7 Part 1 Group Reaction

JP Lorie

I generally agree with the group, it seems apparent that he was driven to commit the original murder with his “justification” that she was a horrible person. But, as we have pointed out, even if that is correct and our protagonist truly believes in such a justice as those that commit wrong doing should die, then he would not have murdered the sister as she walked in. According to his previous”justifications” the murder is only appropriate because she was a horrible person but the sister was innocent. This changes the dynamic of Rodia as he has committed true murder without proper motive.

What I also want to point out however is similarity to “The Stranger”, both seem to have such a simplicity towards life that it makes them stand out within their own societies. Although Rodia is ruled more by his own emotions both are unique and even isolated within their societies. Rodia is constantly ruled by a dualistic nature, trying to help with out sacrifice. He is distraught by so many different emotions about this murder its as if watching a creature stuck between fight and flight and trying to do both at the same time. He can’t help but fight and then he tries to run away from everything around him and his own crimes.

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Chapter 7 Reaction

Laura Vargas

September 30, 2012

Period 1

Chapter 7 Reaction

             In chapter seven one sees a more ruthless personality within Rodia. He had justified his murder by convincing himself that Aliona had caused too much harm and deserved to die, however he selfishly kills Lizaveta as well just to save himself from facing justice for the murder that he committed. However, Rodia admits that what he did was wrong by immediately running away from the scene in a state of panic. Had he thought that what he did was moral he would not have run away. Dostoevsky foreshadows that Rodia will be caught at some point by pointing out that the door was open the whole time.

            I agree with Brittany in stating the irony of Rodia being in the same position as Aliona was just before her death. Dostoevsky could be using this moment for both of them as a symbol of them being about to face something life-changing, such as her being murdered right after and he probably going to jail sometime soon because of those men. I agree with Spencer as well in his thoughts on how Rodia will spend the next few weeks. Like he pointed out, Rodia has shown two personalities so he will probably switch from guilt and paranoia about the murder to thinking that what he did was right and that he should not be punished.

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Part 1 Chapter 7

 

JP Lorié

The crime has finally occurred! Raskolnikov using the cigarettes as a distraction and the axe as a weapon, kills Alyona. We see this action occur so quickly that it almost is a blur, we find her dead on the ground and struck several times over and over. What is interesting is the passion that this depicts, almost that of pure hatred yet mere pages ago we saw so much self doubt. It seems like he can simply toss his humanity and fear, from the dream, aside and commit this crime. He then is forced to kill her sister as well because she becomes a witness. I find it interesting to see if this murder is more the detachment of emotion or more fear. I think that’s crucial in determining what kind of character we are dealing with. Are we seeing the development of a serial killer or simply panic or even something of both. It is plausible that he did kill Alyona out of some delusional rationality, she was a truly horrible human being but then again her sister was completely innocent and he strikes her with the axe without any kind of hesitation, suddenly its a crime out of protection, from arrest. I do think that this is going to be the only crime however, unless he commits more in the attempt to hide this original sin. The rest of the novel may revolve around the consequences of this one action, thus the punishment. I believe we are going to see the other side of Raskolnikov’s emotional spectrum as the guilt and fear kicks in. We even see this begin as he realizes he left the door open and has to run and hide in a different room.

Chapter 6 Reaction

Laura Vargas

September 30, 2012

Period 1

Chapter 6 Reaction

            In chapter six Dostoevsky tries to show the planning of the murder from Rodia’s perspective. Rodia believes that hearing the men talking about Aliona was more than a coincidence and after hearing their take on murdering her his mind begins to wonder what it would be like. I think the conversation that he overheard and his decision to follow through with the murder bring up an interesting point about the death penalty.

Those men point out how much good could be done with Aliona dead, her being alive is only hurting people. Similar to the controversy surrounding the death penalty, the men realize that although she is as good as dead in their eyes they would not be capable of killing her. Dostoevsky pointing that out shows that he knows murder is not justifiable and no one deserves to be killed no matter what they have done. However, Rodia’s resolution to murder her and his thought that justice will be served shows that he has a different perspective on rectitude.

Rodia’s methodical planning of the murder brings to question why he wants to kill her so badly. How exactly has he been affected that makes him so dead-set on making Aliona pay for what she has done? At no point does Rodia wonder what could happen to him if his plans fail and he gets caught? He has not gotten to the point of valuing his freedom and thinking before he acts because he needs to get rid of that burning desire to be the hero and do what the others are not capable of doing.

Crime and Punishment reaction to group opinion chapter 7 end of part 1

Brittany Schrager

September 30, 2012

Period 1

Crime and Punishment chapter 7 reaction to group’s ideas

In Spencer’s first response he discusses how the author greatly evokes the murders Rodia commits and the plot of the chapter. I agree with Spencer when he says, “The author does a great job in expressing the thoughts of Rodia during these murderous actions. We clearly can infer that he is a deep state of paranoia and is not fully aware of the oncoming consequences that I feel will certainly come.” Rodia definitely does not realize what will come from this horrible crime he has done and is can be inferred that Rodia is an impulsive paranoid person. The author clearly gives us the idea that Rodia will either be consumed of guilt and turn himself in, ill from paranoia, or kill himself, not being able to take the overbearing anxiety.

I also agree with Spencer’s second response to chapter 7 when predicts that Rodia will be consumed with anxiety and paranoia so much to the fact that he will not be able to function. I think he will spend weeks, if not months, completely isolated from the outside world, ill from distress. I believe that as the story continues as Spencer says we will see the one side of Rodia (the evil side), joyful, and righteous, but the other side (his human, good side) will be raked with suffering and suspicion. Since the novel is called Crime and Punishment I think it will only be a matter of time until the punishment that Rodia will receive is revealed.

Thoughts on Part 2 entails

Spencer Levine

Part one ends with a lot of loose ends. What is to happen to Rodia is obviously the main one. This man has just committed two bloody murders with the door to the apartment wide open. Two men had heard the screams and should definately be suspicious of what has gone on. It is almost impossible to think that Rodia is going to get away scott free. The title of the book is Crime and PUNISHMENT! We have just seen the crime and one can presume that punishment is going to come.

I am going to take a guess on what is going to happen in part two. I think that Rodia is going to fall into a deeper state of paranoia and will be unable to leave his apartment for weeks. He is going to think that every person walking through the hallway is there to take him away. He is either going to eventually get caught or commit suicide. I think that this will happen because Rodia has two seperate thought processes, one of evil and the other of kindness. There is going to be a certain point during these few weeks that Rodia will simply break down and have to make a decision. Will he confess out of the pure feeling of guilt? Or will he stay strong and be quiet? The decision that Rodia is going to make is going to be completely dependent on the thoughts that he is having at that exact moment, if it is of kindness then he might confess, if it is of evil then he might continue on killing for the sheer rush of it. I look forward to seeing how Rodia develops over the next few chapters.

Reaction to Chapter 7

Spencer Levine

Chapter seven was a nice summation of all of the preceding chapters of part one. In chapters 1-6, the reader knows about the devious actions that Rodia wishes to commit; however we do not know if he will actually follow through with it. It is not until he is waiting outside the gypsies door with an ax in his jacket pocket that we really get the idea that this is going to happen. The author does a great job in expressing the thoughts of Rodia during these murderous actions. We clearly can infer that he is a deep state of paranoia and is not fully aware of the oncoming consequences that I feel will certainly come.

One thing that I really liked in chapter seven was the twist that the author throws in after Rodia successfully murders the old lady. The entrance of Lizaveta completely changes the flow of the story. Rodia had not intially inteded to kill this second women but was forced to after she had witnessed his being in the apartment with the old lady dead on the floor. Rodia has now committed two murders which is twice as bad as committing one. He has now sunk himself into an even a deeper hole as Brittany had said. He fleesd the scene of the crime in a state of panic. He knows what he has done and is obviously distraught by this. While it is not easy to see, the reader gets a hint that the other side of him, the “good” side almost wishes that  he had not gone through with it.