Part 2 Chapter 3 and 4

JP Lorie

The guilt of Raskonikov is exponentially growing more and more. The chapter opens with our character awaking to find himself surrounded by people apparently having been asleep for four days. Sleep within this novel seems to be an important tool. We only have him in restless sleeps when he is unable to endure what is going on around him. As if it is his only escape, this would explain why he would be completely passed out for four days. The murder itself, as predicted before seems to be the true punishment of Raskonikov. His guilt tears him up and makes him unable to function in his normal life, which ironically only leads for him to receive more attention from those around him rather then “escape” from them. In fact the extra attention especially from his friend Razumikhin, only annoys him possibly because he knows the extra attention may make him stand out as a witness.

Chapter four is used by the author to express the views of the average person within the novel. It is seen that they do not believe that the artist is the true killer as the police believe. This interest in the case and disbelief of Raskonikov’s peers may lead to his discovery as the killer.

 

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Predictions and Reactions to chapters 3 and 4 part 2

Spencer Levine

As I previously stated in my previous blogs (haha), chapters three and four of part two left off with a couple of unanswered questions. What I predict will happen in the forecoming chapters of part two will be the investigation and suspicion of Rodia’s role in the murder of the two women. We are already introduced to the detective, Zamyotov which to me, is a pretty clear sign that Rodia must be a suspect. I also think that Rodia’s condition will improve by the time the next Part comes around.

What these two chapters really revealed to me was the humane side of Rodia. Many of us thought that he had some sort of mental problem which lead to many of his irrational decisions, but his inability to deal with the stress, paranoia, and anxiety caused by the murder leaves him in a state of unconsciousness. I am curious to find out who the mystery man in the doorway is as I think that he or she will play a pivotal role in what is to happen next.

As for my reaction to one of your blogs, I completely agree with Lauren on the fact that Razhumikhin is a foil character to Rodia. For example,  Razhumikhin provides Rodia with food, clothing, and comfort without an even thinking twice about it. He is by Rodia’s side during his time of need, something like Lauren stated, was uncommon for a man whom he was not even that close with. I am interested to discover more attributes of the two that could further enhance the point that Lauren and I have just made.

Ch 3 and 4 Part 2 anaylsis

Spencer Levine

I would first like to start off by saying that I find it extremly difficult to follow each individual character’s actions and thoughts due to the difficulty in pronouncing their names. I mean could the author make it any more difficult to tell them apart? Besides that, I think that these two chapters played a pivotal role in what the reader can assume will happen next. We learn in chapter three that Rodia is not doing well, he is in a deep state of paranoia and is unable to really control his own actions. He has been slipping in and out of consiousness for the past four days and whether he likes it or not, is depending on his family and friends to keep him going. Chapter three is also the first  time that we get a true understanding of who Razumikhin is. We are told in previous chapters that the two are friends and hence is the reason why he is there for Rodia during his time of need.

Chapters three and four contained a good amount of uninformed information that left me in a state of confusion. One being why Razumikhin has been working to clear the painter’s name. First of all, how does he even know about the murder? Infact, how does anyone besides Rodia know about the murder? Another thing is does anyone even question why Rodia has spent the last few days drifting in and out of consciousness? Finally, who was the mystery man that appears in the door at the conclusion of chapter four? All of these questions I hope are answered as I am anxious to figure out what the rest of the story has in store.

Crime and Punishment reaction to Laura’s opinion

Brittany Schrager

October 28, 2012

Period 1

 

Crime and punishment reaction to Laura’s ideas

 

Laura presents the idea that as part two continues to unfold Rodia is even more distressed than usual. Not only is he drifting in and out of consciousness throughout chapter 2 but also he is extremely ill and paranoid. The guilt of what he has done consumes him and he is haunted by it. As the chapter continues people begin to visit him, which in turn lead to his suffering and terror. Evidently no one knows yet why Rodia is ill, so they believe him when he says he is feeling better.

Unfortunately this is not the case. Rodia is still very mentally and physically ill. I predict that as the story continues his condition will become even worse and he may even begin to hallucinate as his paranoia increases and his guilt heightens. I believe he will hallucinate the woman’s ghost and begin to live in a world full of terror. I also believe that it is only a matter of time before his conscious “break lose” and he admits what he has done. I feel with the kind of person Rodia is he will eventually turn himself in not being able to carry the burden anymore. Since, as a group, we are still in the beginning middle of the story I predict that the author will develop the terror and paranoia Rodia is suffering even further and then at the stories climax I believe Rodia will turn himself in pleading guilty to the murder.  

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Crime and Punishment Chapter 1 part 2

Brittany Schrager

October 28, 2012

Period 1

Crime and Punishment Part 2 chapter 1 reaction

In chapter one of part two the reader presents Rodia as a paranoid, anxious, distressed, ill person. He has isolated himself from all forms of communication refusing to eat and constantly having nightmares. The reader can clearly infer that Rodia’s good side is raked with guilt and remorse. Rodia has driven himself to the point where he cannot even get out of bed. When the police take Rodia to the station to pay his overdue debt to his landlady both sides of Rodia are present. When Rodia finds out this is just a trivial matter and nothing to do with the murder, he is utterly relieved and elated, but as he spends more and more time at the station and outside the isolation of his room, he becomes raked with feelings of guilt and has the sudden urge to admit everything and plead guilty. Fyodor continues to show how each side of Rodia is fighting the other to exist.

Fyodor uses amazing imagery and description in this chapter. When Rodia is walking through the streets to the train station to author describes the seen as crowded, dark, and dusty. This helps to evoke the mood of the chapter and the anxious, paranoid feelings of Rodia. Fyodor also gives great description of Rodia’s different feelings as both of his sides are shown thoroughly. Seeing how this chapter ended I predict it is only a matter of time before Rodia’s shame and remorse gets the best of him and he is forced to plead guilty.       Image

Lauren Beveridge

Period 1

10/28/12

In response to Laura’s reaction to part two chapter three, there are certain points where I agree, but there are also many instances where our opinions differ. Laura stated, “For the past few days he has been floating in and out of consciousness due to what is most likely a panic attack.” Having suffered from severe panic attacks myself, I understand that it is very unlikely that Rodia suffered from a mere panic attack. While it seems like an eternity in the time one is experiencing the attack, these panic attacks are actually relatively short. Four days is undoubtedly too long for a panic attack, and it is also very rare that the victim loses consciousness. It is characteristic of panic attacks that the victim has this experience because he is overly aware of his surroundings or emotions. He is therefore overcome by that sense of panic. Rodia’s episode is characterized by a more docile sort of flutter from conscious moments to rest. This abnormally long time period and shift from consciousness to unconsciousness, serves to show the reader Rodia’s internal struggle with his separated sides, and ultimately his rebirth as an altered protagonist. I also do not believe that the only reason Razumikhin and Nastasya are helpful and caring towards him merely because they like him. I sense an underlying motive which will be revealed later in the novel. I am not saying that Razumikhin is fake and not trustworthy. I do believe that he is truly kind because he serves the purpose of acting as Rodia’s foil, but there is not the possibility that he is doing this selflessly. Man does not have the capacity to be selfless. It could merely be an experience in his past that he wishes to repent for, or maybe he simply wishes for fewer years in purgatory, but he is most definitely not selfless.

Part 2 Chapters 3 and 4 Analysis

Lauren Beveridge

Period 1

10/28/12

Rodia’s awakening at the beginning of chapter three serves as a symbol for the birth of a new situation, circumstances, and also an altered protagonist. He awakens to the knowledge that he has been cared for by Razhumikhin , Nastasya, and his land lady for four whole days. He has also been visited by Zossimov, a doctor, and Zamyotov, a detective. Throughout this time, Razhumikhin has kept Rodia’s creditors calm using his attributed placating attitude and words. These chapters allow Razhumikhin to develop, and let the reader fully come to terms with his goodness. I believe he exists to serve as a foil for Rodia because it is very rare that a man is this caring. No man is selfless, therefore, I question his motives in being such a trustworthy friend to Rodia without much explanation or rather, an apparent reason. Raskolnikov, instead of performing a good deed and then regretting it as usual, has a good deed done to him. Out of pity and worry, Razhumikin provides Rodia with clothing, Rodia responds with anger as opposed to gratitude, which is the expected reaction for someone who is given a gift. Also, Razhumikhin serves as a reminder to the reader that circumstances and environment are not the sole cause of Rodia’s crime. Razhumikhin is in the same situation, but he manages without even pondering the possibility of committing crime.