Chapter 3 Part 3

Lauren Beveridge

Period 1

11/27/12

In chapter three of part three I loved how Fyodor Dostoevsky switched the gender roles entirely from what was necessary and expected in 19-century fiction novels. It is typical for the man to be in control, put together, and righteous, while the woman cries and relies on the man for stability. This has been a stereotype for millions of years. The man is the provider because women are too weak and fragile to support another person, much less an entire family. In this case, Dostoevky presents Dunya and Rodia as characters with personalities and a family dynamic completely contradictory to the norm. Dunya is thoughtful and sweet, yet practical and intelligent as well. She proves this by her plan to test her fiancée before marrying unlike many other women who will stand by their man and believe anything that comes out of his mouth because they have the finances and are also necessary in having children. I believe that Dunya is aware of her many charms, and therefore, she knows that if Luhzin is not the right man for her, then she can easily find a new suitor who will make her happy. This plan of Dunya’s completely proves Rodia’s primary beliefs about their relationship to be incorrect. Meanwhile, Rodia is completely falling apart even though he is supposed to be the man. 

Part III Chapter 3

Lauren Beveridge

Period 1

11/27/12

In this chapter of part three of the novel, Rodia’s emotions are becoming more bipolar and obvious to his friends and even strangers. He goes from moments of complete and utter mania to severe depression and anger that is completely uncalled for. In this chapter, even Zossimov, a stranger to the family, notices and becomes suspicious of Zossimov’s behavior such as his fainting spell after Dunya says that she is “guilty of no one’s death”. I believe that Dostoevsky is slowly showing the reader that Rodia and humans in general, do not have the gall or ability to save themselves from revealing a serious crime out of intense guilt, and possibly the desire of sharing their success in performing a murder and escaping suspicion. I do wonder how much longer Dostoevsky can drag out Rodia’s state of guilt and his strange attitude. There are six parts to the book and I am only on part three. I question whether Dostoevsky will have Rodia be found out and labeled as guilty for the crime. If so, I believe he will emphasize the differences and similarities between a person punishing themselves and a person being punished by the state. I would say being punished by the state is better than a person punishing themselves because if everyone were to know a crime I committed, then it would not lie so heavily on my conscious.

Part III Chapters 1 and 2

Lauren Beveridge

Period 1

11/11/12

I would like to expand on Laura’s statement she made in her post titled, “Rodia Vs. Luhzin”. Upon first reading of Rodia’s immediate hated for Luhzin, I though it was absolutely ridiculous, and his mental instability was causing him to make completely irrational decisions about people he does not know anything about. Now I believe he was correct in his intuitions. Ninety-five percent of the time, my intuitions about a person I have never met are correct. It is very rare that a person proves my opinion wrong upon getting to know them, and if my opinion does change, it is often regressed back to my original opinion after getting to know them too well. Rodia had a strong sense of dislike for Luhzin from the beginning of the novel, and Luhzin has yet to prove Rodia, or anyone else wrong with his behavior. Laura posed a great question as to why Dunya and her mother are residing in a hotel with such poor quality service and accomodations when he is described as a rich man. He is either very selfish, or there is something very strange and suspicious going on that the reader does not know about yet. There could also be the interpretation that Rodia will never like any man that Dunya is with simply because he is protective over her. I believe there is a little of this present in his opinion of Luhzin as well.

Part III Chapters 1 and 2

Lauren Beveridge

Period 1

11/12/12

In my opinion, these chapters are a nice break from the seriousness of this novel. These next couple chapters allow the character of Dunya, Rodia’s sister, to really develop. She is portrayed as practical, caring, smart, charming, and attractive. All of these elements in one woman are bound to make her an attractive companion and wife for many men. This is shown by Razumikhin’s sudden love and sense and loyalty towards her although he barely knows her. His quick and unexpected reveal of his feelings for her could be attributed to the fact that he was quite drunk during his encounter with her, but it is questionable. This is because the next day, he cannot help but tell her his feelings again even though he claimed to be thoroughly embarrassed by his actions of the previous night and he also said they were ridiculous. The element of humor and a light-hearted topic being added to the novel makes the book all the more interesting because it also contributes another subplot to the already complicated story. Dostoevsky continues to add humor to these chapters of the novel by discussing Zossimov’s love for himself. He is similar to Luzhin in that fashion, although he is relatively unimportant to the story. One important thing that he does do is claim that Rodia’s guilt is an “obsession” or mental illness. I view this as a commentary on a doctor’s inclination to brush unusual behavior off as an illness, rather than a viable human emotion. This can also be related to the mental institutions of the past where people often remained committed in the institution even if it was no longer necessary, or was never necessary at all.

Rodia vs Luzhin

Laura Vargas

November 11, 2012

Period 1

Tension Amongst the Characters

            Since early on in the novel readers got to see how bothered Rodia was with the news of Dunia’s engagement to Luzhin. We also saw the drama that went down when Rodia and Luzhin met. However, we did not get to see Luzhin from an un-biased perspective. It is often said that family are always on the lookout for each other. Rodia had a bad feeling about Luzhin from the start and we can see why in chapter one of part three.

Luzhin has been made out to be very wealthy and marrying Dunia because of his wealth. It is very strange that considering his wealth he got Dunia and Pulcheria such shabby accomodations for their visit. One would expect him to try and find the best lodging for his fiancée and soon to be mother in law, but he does not. From this point one begins to see that he may not be all that he is set out to be and maybe Rodia was right.

Luzhin’s strange behavior is heightened with the letter that Pulcheria received from him. Why has he been missing all the meetings that he has promised with them? And then he basically asks for them to choose between him and Rodia. It is very immature of him to try and get the two of them to choose between him and their son/brother. If he is of the caliber that they believe, he would respect their relationship with their only other family member and not try to get between him. I think that this letter foreshadows more heat between him and Rodia and even Razumikhin as he is so disturbed by Luzhin and is starting to want Dunia.

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Reaction to Ch 7 part 2

Spencer Levine

Period 1

November 11, 2012

Reaction to Chapter seven part two

Chapter seven starts off with the poor drunken man Marmeladov lying injured in the street after having been trampled by a horse-drawn carriage. It turns out that Rodia is not that bad of a person as he decided to take this fallen man back to his house. There we find out that Marmeladov is going to die and the family is going to be on their own. Once again Rodia leaves the family with a few rubles before he goes on his way. I would like to talk about what I like to consider is Good Rodia vs Bad Rodia.

It seems that good Rodia is characterized by unselfishness, kindness, and generosity. He is compassionate and willing to help others. I think that Rodia simply recognizes that this family is in a much worse state than he is and that is why he feels the need to help them. I also believe that Rodia could unconsciously be trying to correct for the murder that he has committed. It is obvious that Rodia is distraught over the murder and it is very likely that he feels the need to do good to take care of the bad.

Another important event that happened in this chapter was the detective telling Raskolinkov that he believes Rodia to be mad or crazy. Rodia was already a suspect and now the lead the detective that he is crazy, a clear sign of the downfall of Rodia. What I also found to be interesting was Rodia’s collapse at the apartment. This collapse is another example of the way he reacts to talks about the murder. It could also be a sign of the downfall of his life.