Svidrigailov — Group Thoughts and My Own

JP Lorie
The big question that appears to be the newest part of this novel is Svidrigailov. Although the pronunciation of his name is probably the biggest mystery in the novel so far his character does offer a new perspective to other characters within the story and furthermore, leaves it audience wondering, “just who is he”.

I think we have all offered some interesting ideas as to what his role is within the story. I do agree with Laura’s two entries on this. I do believe that his role is possibly solely one of being a foil. One of your points was his interaction with Rodia when he offers the money. Rodia declines and throughout this portion Rodia questions not only the intentions of Svidrigailov but also the sanity of him. This provides an interesting contrast to Rodia as we see the family side of him looking out for Dunya but none the less, we still see a deeply unseated man questioning the sanity of Svidrigailov. We also have a similar scenario with Luzhin as he wishes for Dunia and is rejected in the eyes of Rodia. I wouldn’t say that either are insane but rather obliviously pompous. And although both bring out a caring family side of Rodia it appears as if they might bring the killer out again depending on if Rodia works through his superman complex.

Reaction to Part 3 chapter 3

Spencer Levine

With my last reflection being about Brittany’s ignorance and immaturity towards the build of the novel, I think I will shift my response to that of what I believe is currently going on in this story and why it is important.
One interesting paragraph that I picked up on was on the bottom of page 216, top of 217, Zossimov’s take on people who have gone mad. Basically he states that the action previously mentioned by Rodia, one in which he claimed he was delirious but yet remembered the entire situation, referring to the time when he helped the near dead man Marmeladov. The doctor notes that while this can be found in sane people, it is more often found in mad people (as in crazy or mentally ill). Now I would have previously thought that in a sutuation like this, one where Rodia is basically being called crazy, he would freak out or faint like he has done in the past, however he seems to embrace the doctor’s opinion a sign that he may use the excuse later to justify his actions.
In addition I also think that this chapter was important because it developed the character of Dunya, Rodia’s sister. We learn in this chapter that she is actually a very confident and resourceful human being, similar to the opposing characteristics of Rodia. She is mentally strong and able/willing to live on her own. She makes this very clear when she not only goes against the wishes of her future husband by telling Rodia to join them at this meeting, but also by the fact that she publicly states that her future with this man is dependent on his reaction to her bringing Rodia, a pretty ballsy move for a young, poor, hungry lady who has just been engaged to a man that can not only provide for her entire family, but is willing to as well. This could be important in future chapters because depending on what happens, Luzhin could potentially save or incriminate Rodia since he is in fact a man of the law. Throughout these past few chapters there has been more of a development of the subplot. However in a 500 page book this must been done because if there was no subplot then the story would just be about a man who kills a women and goes crazy, that story can be written in under 300 pages. I like what the author has done and continue to look forward to reading the book as I am fascinated by the complexity of our main character. Wow that was a long entry!

Reaction to Brittanys “Nothing new here”

Spencer Levine

I just want to start off by saying that we are all friends and if I hurt anyone’s feelings, I am sorry (not sorry) but I am here to simply tell my opinion of the novel and discuss my partners thoughts and how i interprete them in accordance to my views on the reading. With that being sad…Brittany you are a dumb piece of shit!
Haha obviously im kidding, but I do disagree with you on the point that this book is boring. While it maybe true that nothing significant has happened, I believe that the build up and continuous characterization of Raskolinikov is in fact fascinating. One of the potential reasons on why you may not have been able to enjoy the book could be that the character of Raskolinikov is too complex for you to fully understand or appreciate. I do not want to say however that I do understand him in his entirety as I dont nor do I believe that Dostoevsky has fully developed him either. However, i do appreciate and attempt to understand/analyze this multi-faceted self-conscious female like murderer who cannot keep his shit together.
I can agree on the point however that nothing major has happened in the book and that I would very much enjoy reading that, but the truth is that that part will come we just have to be patient and enjoy the detail and build up that the author has created. I GUARANTEE that the current suspense that is building will play a pivital role in the chapters to come, otherwise not only would it not be a best seller, but the author would most likely not take this much time to develop his characters. Love you Britt just got a different opinion on this one!

Reaction to Spencer’s blog for chapter 2 part 3

Brittany Schrager

January 27, 2013

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Crime and Punishment reaction to Spencer’s blog on part 3 Chapter 2

 

 

I completely agree when Spencer mentions how this chapter isn’t about Rodia at all; It his actually about society’s opinion of him. We see Rodia from the eyes of Razamukhin. I also agree with Spencer when says that this is a very important opinion. Family and Friends know the most about you so there opinion counts. Obviously to Rodia it is not that important he continues to deceive them with not telling them the reason for his illness and being extremely rude to Dunia. He does seem that he feels bad about it the next morning but not of what a normal person would feel. I wonder if he really cares at all of just pretends to care because that is what is expected of him.

We are even more altered to the fact of his strangeness by the fact that Rodia has never been in love. He did pretend once and almost got married it has never actually been really to him. Maybe he has Aspergers. I am beginning to feel that because he his awkwardness and insanity there must be something wrong with him. As always this book’s plot has not improved or given light to anything new at all.                                 

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Nothing New Here!

Brittany Schrager

January 27, 2013

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Crime and Punishment Part 3 Chapter 2

 

 

Yet again nothing noteworthy has occurred in the plot of chapter 2 Part 3. Rodia is still ill and the only action that occurred was that of his family worrying about him. The mother fears for her son’s health, the daughter is hurt by Rodia’s words, the doctor tries to comfort them and as always nobody make any connections. They all know the effects but the not the cause of his “illness” in the first place. The only slightly interesting section in this chapter is how madly Razumkhin has fallen for Dunia and how there may be a hint that she has fallen for him too, even if she doesn’t know it yet.

At this point I am seriously questioning the author’s purpose of writing 500 pages. For the past dozen chapters nothing has changed, except my level of frustration. How can a book so tedious be known as an enduring “Barnes and Nobles Classic”? I am praying for this book’s plot to become more fascinating because Fyodor’s use of language and description is exquisite. Maybe if Fyodor had rushed the book plot more, this book would be more engaging or maybe it is the reader that is the problem. These days we expect excitement at every turn and cannot even stand being bored for a second without becoming frustrated. Maybe it is a very exciting book, but because of this generations expectations it is deemed boring. Whatever the case is I pray that, at least for my grade’s sake, this story will improve.
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Rodia’s Revelation

Laura Vargas

January 27, 2013

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Reaction: Part 4, Chapter 3

Rodia’s Revelation

 Luzhin’s departure brings joy to all, showing the mutual understanding that he is not the guy for Dunia. Rodia finally does what he has been wanting to do for a while and makes the decision to separate himself from all his loved ones until he gets his act together. He holds onto his family-man trait in the sense that he makes the decision once he realizes that his mother and sister will be taken care of by a person he trusts. This consideration marks the beginning of a change in his character. For the first time, he seems to care for others and not just for himself. While Rodia’s decision to leave is different than Sonia’s prostitution and Dunia’s decision to become engaged to Luzhin, it reflects his understanding of the importance of family.

For the majority of the novel, Rodia has been battling two sides of his personality. The angry, lonely, murderer, and the loving, family man; it is to his benefit to attempt to separate himself from both sides, so that he can return a new man. The fact that he leaves show that he is preparing himself to face the consequences of his actions; either he plans on admitting or he thinks that he will be caught soon. To heighten this, readers learn that Razumikhin finally catches on to it and realizes that Rodia is the murderer. The question left for one to ponder over is how deep Razumikhin’s love for Rodia is. Will he remain calm and watch over Rodia’s mother and sister until he receives an explanation or will he feel betrayed and completely turn his back on Rodia?

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Part 3 Ch 5 and 6 Reaction

Lauren Beveridge
Period 1
January 25, 2013

Finally the book is beginning to pick back up again. To be honest, I was really dreading starting this chapter, but I was pleasantly surprised. The excitement started when Porfiry asked Rodia if there were painters outside of the shop two days before the murder. Rodia remembered that there were painters on the day of the murder, but not two days before. He saves himself and answers “no”, but Rodia is nervous and awkward because he realizes this could have been a trap fabricated by Porfiry. His nervous and suspicious behavior is not lost on Porfiry. This sudden excitement was much needed and much appreciated by me. Also, Rodia’s article, “On Crime”, is Fyodor Dostoevsky’s way of finally explaining Rodia’s motivation and thoughts behind the murder he committed. Up to this point, Rodia has not clearly explained anything regarding his rationale behind the murder and this has kept the reader in the dark for much of the book, making the book more stagnant than it could be. Rodia’s rationale reminds me of that behind superheroes such as Spiderman and Batman. They are normal people, but they believe they are more extraordinary than other people, and therefore, do not have to follow the laws of common men because they can follow their own moral code. I believe that a man who believes this is the most dangerous type of criminal because they believe they are just in their cause.