Reaction to Chapter 5 part 3

WOW! Hows that for some excitement Brittany? I told you to just be patient and soon enough the rest of the story will develop. In this chapter, Rodia and Raskolinkov go to Porfiry’s (The official investigating the murder) house to attempt to get back some of the goods that the pawnbroker had been holding for Rodia. It immediately becomes clear that he is nervous and is going to have to put up a serious front in order to make it out of here still not guilty. What I found to be so fascinating in this chapter was once again the thought process and analysis of the conversation that Rodia seemed to perceive. I myself even got confused as to what was actually happening and what was being made up in Rodia’s head. Did the man actually wink at him three times or did he just imagine that?
The other thing that I found to be remarkable in this chapter was the fact that the reader now finds out about an article that Rodia had wrote to a newspaper concerning the attitudes and thoughts of a murderer or criminal before and after a crime is committed. WELL ISN’T THAT GOING TO BE IMPORTANT!!!!!? I am almost mad at the author for failing to reveal such pivotal information so late in the story. I think that this article is most definately affecting the behavior of Rodia as this article is what his thoughts are on a criminal before he became one, and now that he is one his brain is most likely going to react similarily.
The last part that I found to be very interesting as well was the differentiation between an extraordinary man and an ordinary man. I could write 500 words on the topic related to the terms used by Rodia, however I will keep this brief. It is ironic that Rodia somewhat claims to be extraordinary when asked by Porfiry, when in fact he could not be any further from it. an extraordinary man does not feel any guilt or remorse, but Rodia has an insane amount. Where is this story going? All we know is that Rodia may have temporarily dodged a bullet.

Rection to Spencer thoughts and predictions

Brittany Schrager

February 24, 2013

Period 1

Reaction to Predictions of Spencer

I also have predicted that Sonya and Rodia will have a relationship later on in story. Something about them together fits and it seems that the author is hinting at this outcome. I think it would also be interesting to see how Rodia will change or not change going into a relationship. Will he be more loving? Will he tell Sonya the whole truth? Will he not change at all and drive her away not wanting to get close to anyone? These are all questions I would have if a relationship between these two were to happen. I also agree with Spencer when he mentions the hint about Sonya appreciating Rodia’s charity. It seems that Sonya believes she has come across a gentleman…boy is she in for a shock! It will be entertaining to see whether Rodia will humor her or fall for her.

I as well agree that Rodia’s paranoia is fascinating. It is remarkably horrifying how paranoia can consume someone to the point where their reality is completely changed. I also agree that is only a matter of time before Rodia slips up and confesses. Whether it will be to his friends or to the police only time will tell

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Reaction to Lauren’s reaction

Brittany Schrager

February 24, 2013

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Crime and Punishment Vampire Parallelism

I completely agree with Lauren we she draws the parallelism with a mythological Vampire and Fyodor’s character Rodia. Not only do they both commit equally sin but they both have the potential to find their own humanity and feel remorse. Rodia and Vampires are also both very reclusive and think being alone is easier. Just like Vampires believe because they are immortal staying alone is easier Rodia, just as Lauren comments, believes staying alone is easier for different reasons. I agree with her prediction when she hypothesizes that Rodia is “retracting from society and his family because he understands that he is likely to be torn from them soon enough because of his sins.” I agree feeling that Rodia wants to break these ties sooner rather than later. 

It was interesting how Lauren drew this parallel because it is a very different idea but completely correct. Even though a Vampire is very different than a human Rodia and a Vampire have very similar characteristics the way they have both been represented. It will be interesting to see how Rodia’s character progresses even more and whether this parallel will stay true for the rest of the plot line.      

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Part 4 Chapter 3 Reaction Part 2

Lauren Beveridge
Period 1
February 24, 2013
At first I thought this was completely selfish and because of his erratic mind set, but I then realized that this was not true. The timing of his exit is a very important clue. He stays after Luhzin leaves, but leaves when Razumikhin promises to care for Dunya and his mother. He is tortured by his crime, but refuses to leave them until he knows they will be protected and supported. I also believe he is not only leaving because he feels guilty, but if he gets caught it will ruin the reputation of his family. Dunya and Sonya both do similar things for their families. Dunya was going to marry Luhzin for her family and Sonya was a prostitute for her family, so although Rodia’s actions are more brash and hurtful than Dunya and Sonya’s, he is doing it for the same reason. I’m also keeping in mind that this was likely not Rodia’s intention all along because if his family was always his first priority, he would not have murdered anyone in the first place, but I think his perspective was slowly changing and then became clear in his mind the moment that Razumikhin promised to care for his family. At first he was excited to start the publishing business, but then when he looked internally, he realized what he had to do and his character shifted dramatically in that moment.

Part 4 Ch 3 Reaction Part 1

Lauren Beveridge
Period 1
February 24, 2013
Part Four Chapter Three

Chapter three brought about a lot of changes in my thoughts regarding Rodia. At first, I though he was completely uncaring towards his family and very impulsive. I thought he only lived to please himself and get immediate satisfaction. Though this may have been true in the beginning of the novel, his persona and attitude are most definitely shifted. He may seem to be the same impulsive and strange man to the people close to him, but in a taking a step back, I realize we are all wrong. This shift in my point of view occurred after Luhzin left Dunya. They are all thrilled to have rid the family of Luhzin’s looming and parasitic presence, but are soon brought back to their worried state when Rodia speaks of the 10,000 rubles Svidrigailov was willing to give Dunya so that she would be with him. Thrilled that Luhzin is now gone and Razumikhin can have Dunya for himself, he immediately offers to act as Dunya’s guard against the man. Dunya accepts which causes Razumikhin to state that they should stay on in St. Petersburg and open a publishing business together. They are all delighted, but suddenly Rodia’s mood shifts again. He abruptly leaves and states that they should not come looking for him.

Overall Impression of Part 4

Laura Vargas

February 24, 2013

Period 1

Reaction: Part 4

Overall Impression of Part 4

I truly believe that it takes a person many mistakes until he/she reaches a state of mind in which they are ready to be the best person that they can. I stand by this belief, as I have seen my life improve as a result of learning from my mistakes and most people around me as well. That being said, I believe that Dostoevsky is trying to get at something in Part four.

Contrary to many, who think that Rodia is a terrible murderer, I have also seen his helpful side and his desire to keep pain away from his loved ones. I believe that he does not want to confess to the murder because he does not want to bring that burden upon his beloved mother and sister.

In part four I, for one, see promise for Rodia. Sure at the moment he is unstable and creepy, but this is because he is carrying all that guilt in his head. If he were such a terrible murderer, he probably would not be feeling so much guilt. I think that Rodia is going to begin doing good deeds and get his life together.  We see his excitement in chapter six when the prisoner confesses, and I think that he sees promise in the prisoner’s confession and hope for himself to get his life back together and become the best person that he can be. He definitely learned the struggles that came along with guilt, so I doubt he will ever commit a crime again. Maybe he can turn his life around and give his mother and sister the happy life that he wishes them.

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Where is the Punishment?

Laura Vargas

February 24, 2013

Period 1

Reaction: Part 4, Chapter 6

Where is the Punishment?

Everyone in the group keeps saying “well the book is called Crime and Punishment, so there must be some punishment at some point,” I believe we were wrong. In chapter six, just as readers were expecting the novel to turn because of Rodia’s confession, it does not. As usual, something happens at the last minute to keep him from getting caught; in this case, the poor man originally accused of the murder confesses. I can only imagine why he would confess to something he did not do- maybe like Hanna he is ashamed of what may be revealed if they investigate his whereabouts the day of the murder, or maybe he is homeless and would rather stay in jail. Whatever the case may be, Rodia remains innocent. Rodia seems to be happy internally that he got to avoid that painful and life-changing situation. He believes that the prisoner’s confession is a sign that something good will happen for him and when the man who had been following him shares his sympathy, Rodia is thrilled that he will avoid punishment.

So the group may ask, “why is the book called Crime and Punishment if there is no punishment?” From the looks of it (there are only two more parts left), it seems that there probably will not be any legal punishment for Rodia but maybe this whole time Dostoevsky wanted to show us Rodia’s struggles and show a more internal form of punishment. 

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