Chapter 7 Reaction

Laura Vargas

September 30, 2012

Period 1

Chapter 7 Reaction

             In chapter seven one sees a more ruthless personality within Rodia. He had justified his murder by convincing himself that Aliona had caused too much harm and deserved to die, however he selfishly kills Lizaveta as well just to save himself from facing justice for the murder that he committed. However, Rodia admits that what he did was wrong by immediately running away from the scene in a state of panic. Had he thought that what he did was moral he would not have run away. Dostoevsky foreshadows that Rodia will be caught at some point by pointing out that the door was open the whole time.

            I agree with Brittany in stating the irony of Rodia being in the same position as Aliona was just before her death. Dostoevsky could be using this moment for both of them as a symbol of them being about to face something life-changing, such as her being murdered right after and he probably going to jail sometime soon because of those men. I agree with Spencer as well in his thoughts on how Rodia will spend the next few weeks. Like he pointed out, Rodia has shown two personalities so he will probably switch from guilt and paranoia about the murder to thinking that what he did was right and that he should not be punished.

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Chapter 6 Reaction

Laura Vargas

September 30, 2012

Period 1

Chapter 6 Reaction

            In chapter six Dostoevsky tries to show the planning of the murder from Rodia’s perspective. Rodia believes that hearing the men talking about Aliona was more than a coincidence and after hearing their take on murdering her his mind begins to wonder what it would be like. I think the conversation that he overheard and his decision to follow through with the murder bring up an interesting point about the death penalty.

Those men point out how much good could be done with Aliona dead, her being alive is only hurting people. Similar to the controversy surrounding the death penalty, the men realize that although she is as good as dead in their eyes they would not be capable of killing her. Dostoevsky pointing that out shows that he knows murder is not justifiable and no one deserves to be killed no matter what they have done. However, Rodia’s resolution to murder her and his thought that justice will be served shows that he has a different perspective on rectitude.

Rodia’s methodical planning of the murder brings to question why he wants to kill her so badly. How exactly has he been affected that makes him so dead-set on making Aliona pay for what she has done? At no point does Rodia wonder what could happen to him if his plans fail and he gets caught? He has not gotten to the point of valuing his freedom and thinking before he acts because he needs to get rid of that burning desire to be the hero and do what the others are not capable of doing.

Raskiolnikov Gaining Perspective

Laura Vargas

September 2, 2012

1st Period

In the second chapter of Crime and Punishment, Dostoevsky highlights the complexity of family life, specifically during times of struggle. Through the introduction of Semion Marmeladov, Raskolnikov is pulled into a world of greater hardships than his own. After being told of the vices of destitution, Raskolnikov is forced to listen to Marmeladov’s stories about his failing family life. From these stories Raskolnikov sees the importance of money to a family. While Marmeladov is without work, his daughter works as a prostitute, his wife is bitter, and the kids are unhappy and hungry. Once Marmeladov gets his job back, his wife and daughter praise his and brag about him. However, Marmeladov’s alcoholism leads him astray once again and he leaves the family without any money. He drunkenly drags Raskolnikov along with him to visit the family, and his wife scolds him and exhibits contempt towards him. By calling him a criminal and a drunk she strips him of his once positive ties with his family.

Seeing the pain that the family was going through impacted Raskolnikov so much that he left them the only money that he had left. He then goes through some thoughts reaximining the situation. Sonia will have to go back to having a yellow ticket and the family will remain in the mess that they got themselves into. He then goes onto question mankind, “What if man is not really a scoundrel, man in general, I mean, the whole race of mankind—then all the rest is prejudice, simply artificial terrors and there are no barriers and it’s all as it should be.” Raskinokov is questioning the justice system, stating that there are no natural laws; crimes are only crimes because we, humans have deemed them to be crimes.